2019-20 Pomona College Catalog 
    
    Mar 31, 2020  
2019-20 Pomona College Catalog

New and Revised Courses


New Courses for fall 2019


New Courses for spring 2020


Revised Courses for spring 2020


AFRI144A AF. Black Women, Feminism(s) and The Visual Arts. P. Jackson. Interdisciplinary seminar explores the ascension of intersectional feminism(s) produced by trailblazing Black women artists, theorists, and activists. Assigned creative and critical interventions interrogate the ways interlocking constructs of race (aestheticized moral ranking system), gender, sexuality, class, religion, and citizenship inform self-perceptions, social status, creative practices, as well as political and economic relationships of power. Situating contemporary feminist work historically, thematically- organized materials highlight key written and visual texts by the nineteenth century and twentieth-century foremothers. Students will compare and contrast strategies for living, thinking, and visualizing love-driven efforts to raise consciousness, manifest political and economic change, and energize social transformations across the African diaspora.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2020.

 

ARHI186W PO. Interrogating Whiteness: Race, Sex and Representation. P. Jackson. Interdisciplinary course studying select African disaporan visual arts interrogating linguistic, conceptual, and visual solipsisms contributing to the construction and reproduction of whiteness in aesthetics, studio art, film, video, and social media. Course assignments and activities develop critical visual literacy employing a constructionist approach to the production of knowledge and cultural criticism. Students encouraged to decode and deconstruct interlocking binary oppositions, such as blackness/whiteness, female/male, propaganda/art, modernity/postmodernity, citizen/immigrant, which dominate in Euroethnic intellectual thought, our racially-gendered relations of power, representational practices, and contemporary [white] nationalist visual grammar. Letter grade only.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2020.

 

EA  099  PO. Introduction to Urban Health Equity: Uncovering Local and Global Disparities. G. Douglass-Jaimes. Where you live impacts how well and how long you live. Yet the social, political, and environmental processes that determine who gets to live where, and what the conditions are in those places provide insights into the drivers for global health disparities. By examining how race, identity, and place operate in the US and Brazil, we can better understand the social processes that create disparities in health. Further, focusing on informal settlements, places that are thought to embody these disparities (areas often referred to as slums, shantytown, favelas), helps to highlight these complex interrelated themes of place, health and identity. This course is designed to provide a broad investigation of urban health equity while focusing on the key role that identity formation and place-making have in both creating health disparities and community responses to ameliorate those disparities. In this course, students will engage with theoretical and practical tools that serve to unmask local and global health disparities. Particularly, students will learn to conduct their analysis using Atlas.ti, a Qualitative Data Analysis (QDA) software. Letter grade only.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Each semester.

 

ENGL078  PO. Medieval Drugs. J. Kirk. It has been proposed that the basis of prehistoric religion (and indeed the origin of human consciousness itself) is the encounter with other worlds that can be brought on by certain hallucinogenic plants. In this seminar we will examine how archaic “techniques of ecstasy” survived, more or less underground, into the European Middle Ages, as well as inquire more generally into the nature and status of inebriation, poisoning, and visionary trance states. To be considered: love potions in medieval romances; the relations between mystical experiences and plant-derived ecstasies; the use of hallucinogens (mandrake, belladonna, etc.) by “witches”; the history of medicine and alchemy; dream visions and astral travel; the pursuit of stupor. Authors may include: Chretien de Troyes, Hildegard of Bingen, B’roul, Julian of Norwich, Abu Nawas, Marie de France, Fernando de Rojas, Walter Benjamin, and the Popol Vuh.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2020.

 

HIST130  CH. Mexico-United States Border: Diaspora, Exiles, and Refugees (CP). A. Mayes. This class is a community engagement course that focuses on the U.S.-Mexico Border, paying specific attention to Haitian and other immigrant groups residing on both of sides of the border. Students will examine the historical formation of the U.S.-Mexico Border and its contemporary political economy. Students will be prepared to conduct research among and will be involved in a community engagement project focusing on immigration policy regarding Haitians and other immigrants currently residing in San Diego/Tijuana. Previously offered as HIST100N CH.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered spring 2020.

 

LGCS105  PO. Syntactic Analysis. M. Diercks. This course examines the sentence structure of natural language, addressing the (mostly unconscious) knowledge people have about language and proposing cognitive structures for that knowledge. For example, we explain why you can run up a bill and run up a hill, but while you can run a bill up, you can’t run a hill up. Over the course of the semester we will adjust our theoretical model of syntax (using the framework of generative syntax), arriving at a set of claims about the nature of syntactic structures that are universal to all languages. The course emphasizes analysis and argumentation, with a writing-centric curriculum. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: LGCS010  PO or equivalent.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Each spring.

 

LGCS183  PO. Topics in Generative Syntax. M. Diercks. Examines recent developments in generative syntactic theory within the framework of the Minimalist Program. Course addresses significant theoretical issues (e.g. Case and Agreement, wh-movement, phases) with respect to a typologically-varied set of languages. Specific topics vary year to year. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: LGCS 105  PO. May be repeated once for credit. Previously offered as LGCS185S PO.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Fall 2020.

 

LGCS184  PO. Topics in Phonology. M. Paster. Advanced topics in phonological theory. Familiarizes students with current original research on one or more specific topics. Topics vary and may include Optimality Theory, phonetically grounded phonology, historical phonology, tonal systems and the phonology-morphology interface. Prerequisites: LGCS 108  PO. May be repeated once for credit. Previously offered as LGCS185P PO.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Fall 2020.

 

LGCS185  PO. Topics in Cognitive Science. M. Zirnstein. An examination of one or more central topics in cognitive science. Normally to be taken in the junior year. Current topics include time perception, attention, emotion and the brain. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: LGCS 011  PO. May be repeated once for credit. Previously offered as LGCS185C PO.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Each spring.

 

NEUR192  PO. Neuroscience Senior Project. R. Lewis. Critical analysis and discussion of the current research literature in neuroscience. Discussion of senior thesis exercise. Topics vary each year. Senior majors only.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Each spring.

 

POLI005  PO. Introduction to Comparative Politics. E. Dobbs. Why do some countries become rich while others remain poor? When and why do we see the outbreak of political violence? or even revolution? Where do nation-states come from? and why do some become democracies? Speaking of democracies, are they threatened by rising levels of nationalism and populism globally? This class introduces major analytical approaches in the field of comparative politics in order to better understand how and why political systems, and their problem, vary across the globe.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Each spring.

 

SPAN182  PO. Contemporary Spanish Poetry: Poetics, Identity, Difference. P. Cahill. Explores the complex representation of identity, difference and sameness in contemporary Spanish poetry. Examines expressions of political, gender, ethnic, linguistic, national and geographic identity through the work of contemporary Spanish poets like Rafael Alberti, Gloria Fuertes, Ana Rossetti and Marta Agudo. Letter grade only. Prerequisites: SPAN 101  PO or a score of 4 or 5 on the AP Spanish Literature exam.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Spring 2020.

 

THEA188  PO. Theory/Criticism/Praxis. J. Lu. This course provides a foundation of basic theories regarding the nature of the theatrical event. What are the main principles, philosophies and questions that have influenced western theatre artists, critics, audiences and scholars in the past and why? How do these principles influence us in the present, and how might they influence the future of theatrical performance? Students will formulate their own aesthetic, philosophical, and critical points of view about theater. Presentations, papers, and weekly discussion will lead towards the final project: a manifesto/ thesis proposal in the format of a TED Talk.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Each spring.

 

Revised Courses for fall 2020


CHEM188  PO. Atmospheric Chemistry. F. Grieman. Chemical and physical principles are used to describe the complex system of the Earth’s atmosphere. Atmospheric structure, design of simple models and atmospheric transport will be covered followed by selected topics concerning geochemical cycles, the greenhouse effect, aerosols, stratospheric ozone, smog and acid rain. Prerequisites: either one of MATH031  PO or equivalent and either PHYS 041 PO , PHYS 042 PO , PHYS 070 PO , or PHYS 070 PO   and PHYS 072 PO . Co-requisites: CHEM 158A PO  or CHEM 156 PO , or instructor permission.

Credit: 0.5

When Offered: Fall 2020.

 

GEOL120  PO. Introduction to Analytical Geochemistry. J. Lackey. The course provides an introduction to routine methods of geochemical analysis of a variety of geological and related materials and the theory behind these techniques as well as methods for evaluation of analytical outcomes. Students will be trained in x-ray diffraction and fluorescence, electron microscopy, inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Analyses of rocks, crystals, fossils, soils, waters, plant materials and other organic matter will be used to frame how these techniques can be used to execute research in the Earth Sciences. Prerequisites: One introductory geology course.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Each fall.

 

MUS 121  PO. Seminar in Music History (Before 1750). Staff. Seminar in music history and literature geared to giving intermediate and advanced students an in-depth experience with a particular topic or corpus of music, and exposure to established methodologies in historical musicology as appropriate to that topic. Courses in the MUS 121 PO series will focus on music and the society in which it was produced from before 1750, or will include substantial engagement with some aspect of repertoire, style and culture of that time. Emphasis on deeper investigations of topics through selected readings, listening, discussions, oral presentations, analytical projects or class performance. Historical engagement with issues related to religion, politics, culture, literature, class, gender and/or other matters through the lens of music as appropriate to the seminar’s focus will also be included. Fulfills one history and literature requirement for Music majors and minors. Prerequisites: MUS 051 PO  and MUS 080 PO  or permission of instructor. Course may be repeated twice for credit.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Spring 2021.

 

NEUR101A PO. Introduction to Neuroscience with Laboratory. Staff. An introduction to the field of neuroscience. Basic principles of neuroscience are covered including how the cells in the nervous system process signals and transmit information, basic brain anatomy and an introduction to human and comparative systems neuroscience. Prerequisites: BIOL 040  PO and BIOL 041C PO. Letter grade only. Previously offered as NEUR101  PO.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Each fall.

 

NEUR101B PO. The Human Brain: From Cells to Behavior with Laboratory. R. Lewis. An advanced laboratory course in the relationships between structure and function that exist in the human nervous system. We will critically analyze methods of exploring the human nervous system including lesion, electrophysiological, neurochemical and neuroimaging approaches. Topics will include sensation and perception, cognition and emotion, movement, regulatory systems and social behavior. Prerequisites: NEUR101A  PO. Letter grade only. Previously offered as NEUR143  PO.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Each spring.

 

PHYS174  PO. Contemporary Experimental Physics. Staff. Experimental study of selected areas in physics and astronomy with emphasis on modern instrumentation and techniques. Discussion of techniques in error analysis and use of professional data presentation packages. Prerequisites: PHYS 101 PO . Co-requisites: PHYS 128 PO  or ASTR 101 PO .

Credit:

When Offered: Each semester.

 

SOC 030  CH. Chicanxs - Latinxs in Contemporary Society. G.Ochoa. Focusing on the contemporary experiences of Chicanas/os and Latinas/os in the United States, this course considers identities, community formation, and migration, along with the ways race, class, and gender are structured in institutions such as the state, media, education, health, and work. Consideration is also given to resistance, activism, conflict, and coalitions.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.

 

THEA010  PO. Devising Theatre. J. Lu. This course provides participants with a performance-based approach to devised/devising theatre. Solo and group performances may be inspired by a variety of forms and content, including interviews, archival materials, visual art, music, and other verbal or movement texts. Students will read, witness, and experience a broad range of approaches to devised theatre, and primarily use in-class time to build skills, collaborate, and rehearse. Work created in class will be given public performance on campus at the end of the semester. Prerequisites: any version of a THEA001 PO course or Permission of Instructor. Letter grade only. May be repeated once for credit.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.

 

THEA060  PO. Devising Theatre. R. Portillo. A practicum-based examination of the theories and practice of creating dramatic work particularly with young audiences. Participants will develop the skills necessary for developing theatre-based curriculum and implementing it in school and other community settings. These skills include: basic theatrical performance techniques, cultural responsiveness, leadership, and team-building. Students may also work with local school groups. Prior theatre experience is desirable but not required. THEA060  PO (.5 course credits) and THEA 061 PO  (1 course credit) are repeatable up to a limit of 2 course credits total from either or both courses.

Credit: 1

When Offered: Offered alternate years; next offered fall 2020.